Summer Project 2010: Week #5

My summer project continues with step #5 …

Week #5: Scanning and photo editing.

This past couple weeks have been a good reminder of why I broke this project into so many little steps. Even though I always anticipate summer with thoughts of leisure and time to work on projects like this, it seems reality is more along the lines of crazy schedules, unpredictable work time and far too many competing interests.

Needless to say, I haven’t made much progress lately.

On tap this week was scanning and photo editing, which really isn’t a very involved process. I have about a dozen print photos that I plan to use in digital layouts, so those needed to be scanned and then edited. That was the easy part.

The challenge has been the pile of larger-sized artwork I had anticipated scanning and reducing into photo-size prints, with the thought that I would keep the photos and then toss the actual artwork. Scrapbookers suggest doing this all the time and it makes sense. Problem is, sentimental me is finding that hard to actually DO now that the time has come.

I’m not sure why I have such a strong attachment to that “stuff” but I sure do. And as logical as replicating it may be, it’s just not the same as having the real thing, complete with faded construction paper, folded corners, missing pieces that have fallen off over time and the inevitable crinkled pieces that always seem to protrude off those elementary creations.

So I hit a roadblock and did not scan the artwork as intended. And in a couple weeks when I put this section together, I will again be faced with the decision of just how to handle these items. Realistically, I probably don’t need to save all this stuff … and I could very well be the only one that would even care if I tossed it. But I’m just not at that point yet …

How about you? Do you find it difficult to part with items like this, even if you have photos or other documentation of the memories? I’d love to hear your thoughts … and any advice you might have for learning to loosen the grip on all that memorabilia.

Next week: Scrapbooking the layouts on my story list.

Kristin Rutten – Get the latest makeup and skincare trends. Visit me, your Mary Kay Independent Beauty Consultant.

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Comments

  1. Vicki says:

    Kristin, I could have written this post! I have three kids ages 17, 13 & 4 (and a half!) and each has a hanging file folder cube full of art and such that I just can’t seem to part with. I have it organized by school year but also have yet to decide what to actually do with it. There’s something about being able to touch the original item. I’m anxious to hear any advice others have too.

  2. Vicki says:

    Kristin, I could have written this post! I have three kids ages 17, 13 & 4 (and a half!) and each has a hanging file folder cube full of art and such that I just can’t seem to part with. I have it organized by school year but also have yet to decide what to actually do with it. There’s something about being able to touch the original item. I’m anxious to hear any advice others have too.

  3. Jenn says:

    As an art teacher with three “arty” kids of my own, let me tell you what I finally did.

    If you look closely at the stuff your kid brings home from school, you’ll see that a lot of it is ‘group’ work – everyone is given the same pieces/supplies, the same instructions and ends up with a piece of work that looks pretty much like everyone else’s. Those I take a photo of my child holding it, then toss the artwork. IMO the work doesn’t say much about who they are at that moment, which is why I take the photo with them in it – to personalize it.

    Other work is original – out of their own heads. In my son’s case it was mostly doodles of epic battles on notebook paper, my daughters have made some wonderful paintings and sculptures. Those go on display in our kitchen (we have frames on the wall for that purpose) then into a box for keeping. Some I photograph to journal about, others I just keep. But truly, this amounts to maybe 4 or 5 pieces a year, which keeps it manageable.

    I know it seems hard to part with the little bird cut out of construction paper, but in the end it won’t mean that much to you. If you can’t stand to part with it, put it all away, and vow at the end of NEXT year you’ll go through the box again. You’ll be amazed what you’re now willing to discard!

    • Jenny says:

      I have a 4 and 7 year old. Now that the younger one is in preschool, I have artwork coming out of my ears!! (and very impressive schoolwork from my older one that I want to hang on to, also.)

      I never seemed to have trouble parting with the projects with very little personaliization (like coloring book pages, or “letter of the day” activities from preschool. I think if you give yourself a reasonable storage area for them to keep the main contenders from getting dusty and wrecked while you decide what is important (at the end of the year), it’s no big deal.

      Consider getting some fresh, clean pizza boxes – let your kid decorate the “inside” while it’s still flat and then assemble it inside-out. – then you have a sturdy, stackable, oversized artwork storage – clearly labled on the side with the name and age. – having 3 or 4 of these boxes stacked and slid under a bed isn’t a big deal, usually. If stuff won’t fit, then its time to go through them.

      I totally agree with the cherished artwork that your kid JUST CANNOT part with and absolutely adores – take a picture of them holding it and then do the dirty deed of tossing it awhile later w/o their knowlege, when you can say “Ok – it’s Febuary – time to decorate for Valentines Day!!” if you have to! lol ((like my daughters “2007” complete with glued on legumes and bean seeds that kept falling off the refrigerator from the weight) in the end, I had to sabatoge it by encouraging my daughter to display it by a sweating window – it ruined it, of course, but I had a good excuse to get rid of it then 🙂

      I still have a life-size outline of me on paper, decorated with falling off bits of wallpaper samples and fabric and ribbon rolled up in a memory box my parent’s gave me. Although it shows how cool the 80’s fashion trends are in my 9-year-old eyes, I’d be satisfied with a picture of it at this point, though I appreciate they kept it for me, for sure.

  4. Jenn says:

    As an art teacher with three “arty” kids of my own, let me tell you what I finally did.

    If you look closely at the stuff your kid brings home from school, you’ll see that a lot of it is ‘group’ work – everyone is given the same pieces/supplies, the same instructions and ends up with a piece of work that looks pretty much like everyone else’s. Those I take a photo of my child holding it, then toss the artwork. IMO the work doesn’t say much about who they are at that moment, which is why I take the photo with them in it – to personalize it.

    Other work is original – out of their own heads. In my son’s case it was mostly doodles of epic battles on notebook paper, my daughters have made some wonderful paintings and sculptures. Those go on display in our kitchen (we have frames on the wall for that purpose) then into a box for keeping. Some I photograph to journal about, others I just keep. But truly, this amounts to maybe 4 or 5 pieces a year, which keeps it manageable.

    I know it seems hard to part with the little bird cut out of construction paper, but in the end it won’t mean that much to you. If you can’t stand to part with it, put it all away, and vow at the end of NEXT year you’ll go through the box again. You’ll be amazed what you’re now willing to discard!

    • Jenny says:

      I have a 4 and 7 year old. Now that the younger one is in preschool, I have artwork coming out of my ears!! (and very impressive schoolwork from my older one that I want to hang on to, also.)

      I never seemed to have trouble parting with the projects with very little personaliization (like coloring book pages, or “letter of the day” activities from preschool. I think if you give yourself a reasonable storage area for them to keep the main contenders from getting dusty and wrecked while you decide what is important (at the end of the year), it’s no big deal.

      Consider getting some fresh, clean pizza boxes – let your kid decorate the “inside” while it’s still flat and then assemble it inside-out. – then you have a sturdy, stackable, oversized artwork storage – clearly labled on the side with the name and age. – having 3 or 4 of these boxes stacked and slid under a bed isn’t a big deal, usually. If stuff won’t fit, then its time to go through them.

      I totally agree with the cherished artwork that your kid JUST CANNOT part with and absolutely adores – take a picture of them holding it and then do the dirty deed of tossing it awhile later w/o their knowlege, when you can say “Ok – it’s Febuary – time to decorate for Valentines Day!!” if you have to! lol ((like my daughters “2007” complete with glued on legumes and bean seeds that kept falling off the refrigerator from the weight) in the end, I had to sabatoge it by encouraging my daughter to display it by a sweating window – it ruined it, of course, but I had a good excuse to get rid of it then 🙂

      I still have a life-size outline of me on paper, decorated with falling off bits of wallpaper samples and fabric and ribbon rolled up in a memory box my parent’s gave me. Although it shows how cool the 80’s fashion trends are in my 9-year-old eyes, I’d be satisfied with a picture of it at this point, though I appreciate they kept it for me, for sure.

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