10 Reasons NOT to Scrap the Negative

  1. You want the world (and possibly yourself) to believe you’ve led a “perfect” life.
  2. You prefer fairy tales and happily-ever-after to comedy, suspense & drama.
  3. You have aspirations of being the next June Cleaver.
  4. You secretly think the “real” you is just too boring.
  5. You’re hoping you can rewrite history by scrapping just the highlights.
  6. You’d prefer that after you’re gone, you’ll simply be forgotten.
  7. “Ac-cent….uate the positive, e-lim…. inate the negative” was drilled into you in grade school.
  8. You’re not one to rock the boat … ever.
  9. You plan to run for public office someday and frankly, those family skeletons can just stay right where they are.
  10. You just haven’t found the perfectly coordinating papers and embellies yet.

green-glasses

All kidding aside, there are a lot of reasons why we tend to avoid scrapbooking the not-so-pretty parts of life.

The frustrations. The disappointments. The failures. Our fears & dashed hopes. The things that keep us awake at night. That big ol’ list of pet peeves that seems to grow longer by the day. What we were really thinking when we opened that gift from Aunt Rose or sat around that stuffy living room pretending to enjoy yet another family get-together. Those moments when our adorable children didn’t quite match up to our expectations of them, or worse – embarrassed the heck out of us. The things we wish our parents had done differently … or would DO differently. That “wonderful family adventure” that really just stunk all the way around, though we tried to make the best of things. How we really feel about spending every summer vacation doing the same, exact thing.

There’s nothing wrong with highlighting only the good in our scrapbooks. There’s definitely value in trying to see the proverbial glass as half-full and to choose to approach life’s circumstances in a positive way. But if our goal is to tell the stories of our life … our real life … it’s pretty tough to do it in an authentic way without including at least a little exploration of those less-than-perfect thoughts, feelings & moments.

balance

Just as in our daily life, it’s all about finding a balance. If you’ve been following along here lately, you know that’s not exactly my strong suit, even in my scrapbooking. I’ll share more about my own pursuit of scrapbooking balance later in the week. But for now, I have a few tips to help you get started if you’d like to add a little more reality to your scrapping…

  1. Think about WHY you scrapbook. What motivates you to spend time creating those pages? If you scrapbook purely for fun (and there is nothing wrong with that), you may not want to bother with adding the negative stuff; whereas, if your goal is to leave a record of your life for future generations, you may have an entirely different approach.
  2. Decide for WHOM you are scrapping. This is very likely influenced by #1 and your answer may vary from one project to another. Are you scrapping for your kids? Your spouse? Your parents? Your friends? Your co-workers? Your CT assignments? Gallery adoration? Future grandchildren? … Yourself?
  3. Determine WHEN you anticipate your pages will be viewed. Do you envision sharing your album with the family at your next holiday gathering or posting every page in our gallery? Or will you be tucking your pages away for your children to read when they are grown? If you’re worried about hurting your mother-in-law’s feelings or sharing information your kids aren’t old enough to understand, knowing that you will be tucking those pages away – safe from sight – until a more appropriate time to let them be seen may help make it easier to actually get those pages scrapped.
  4. QUIT taking yourself so seriously. Remember that no one’s life is perfect – even when it appears otherwise in the galleries – and scrapbooking is a great way to share the ways we are all so imperfectly alike. The sky is not going to fall if you admit on a scrapbook page that you really don’t like Great Aunt Edna’s cooking. Really … it won’t.
  5. Remind yourself that you don’t necessarily have to share every layout in your online gallery, Facebook page … or even with your spouse or best friend. Real life scrapbooking can be extremely therapeutic – and it’s OKAY to scrapbook entirely for YOU. And who knows… maybe the process of scrapping some of that stuff you don’t necessarily want the world to know about will help you get to the point where you are ready to share – and move on.

Click on “comment” below to share your thoughts…

Comments

  1. Anonymous says:
  2. Debbie Hodge says:

    this is wonderful, Kristin.

  3. Debbie Hodge says:

    this is wonderful, Kristin.

  4. Sue Moyer says:

    This is a great topic. Number 3 is definitely for me. I do scrapbook the real truth when it comes to my mother-in-law. Would she like it? Definitely not but that is the way she is and the truth hurts sometimes. Since I scrapbook for ME and not her, I do what I want in my albums. She would never look at them anyway. She has already told me that "string is more important to her than photos". Yep, those were her exact words.

  5. Sue Moyer says:

    This is a great topic. Number 3 is definitely for me. I do scrapbook the real truth when it comes to my mother-in-law. Would she like it? Definitely not but that is the way she is and the truth hurts sometimes. Since I scrapbook for ME and not her, I do what I want in my albums. She would never look at them anyway. She has already told me that "string is more important to her than photos". Yep, those were her exact words.

  6. Lee says:

    GREAT post :) I’m all about they every day – which has a bit of good, a bit of bad, and a ton of adventure with my four active kids! I like things to be nice and orderly, but sometimes that can be too blah :) LOVE your words!

  7. Lee says:

    GREAT post :) I’m all about they every day – which has a bit of good, a bit of bad, and a ton of adventure with my four active kids! I like things to be nice and orderly, but sometimes that can be too blah :) LOVE your words!

  8. ltarbox says:

    Great post Kristin! I definitely find it therapeutic to scrap all the “not-so-perfect” parts of my life.

  9. ltarbox says:

    Great post Kristin! I definitely find it therapeutic to scrap all the “not-so-perfect” parts of my life.

  10. tbaker8506 says:

    Before my Logbook I never would have thought to scrap the less-than-perfect moments in my life. I am learning so much more about my favorite hobby and myself in the process. Who needs a shrink??
    =)

  11. tbaker8506 says:

    Before my Logbook I never would have thought to scrap the less-than-perfect moments in my life. I am learning so much more about my favorite hobby and myself in the process. Who needs a shrink??
    =)

  12. eryn says:

    Fabulous post Kristin! Very inspiring!

  13. eryn says:

    Fabulous post Kristin! Very inspiring!

  14. Jen Y says:

    I don’t have children, so the way I look at it is what do I want to remember about my life down the road? If there are bad points, do I want to remember them? And then anything that is too personal -bad or good- I have a private scrapbook for that-it’s only viewed by me, or my husband if I choose. I look at it like it’s my diary so to speak and I wouldn’t want anyone reading that.

    • Tracy says:

      Jen Y has a fantastic approach here. I am in the same boat as her regarding having no children. There are things that I do want to ‘remember down the road’. I have only been scrapping the ‘good and pretty’ things, not necessarily my real feelings.
      I am going to start doing the ‘diary scrapbook’ that will only be viewed by myself (I don’t mind if my husband sees it). I know that this will be extremely therapeutic for me to do. I’m going to start it today in fact. Thank you for the tip Jen, I greatly appreciate it.

  15. Jen Y says:

    I don’t have children, so the way I look at it is what do I want to remember about my life down the road? If there are bad points, do I want to remember them? And then anything that is too personal -bad or good- I have a private scrapbook for that-it’s only viewed by me, or my husband if I choose. I look at it like it’s my diary so to speak and I wouldn’t want anyone reading that.

    • Tracy says:

      Jen Y has a fantastic approach here. I am in the same boat as her regarding having no children. There are things that I do want to ‘remember down the road’. I have only been scrapping the ‘good and pretty’ things, not necessarily my real feelings.
      I am going to start doing the ‘diary scrapbook’ that will only be viewed by myself (I don’t mind if my husband sees it). I know that this will be extremely therapeutic for me to do. I’m going to start it today in fact. Thank you for the tip Jen, I greatly appreciate it.

  16. Talia says:

    I was so scared when I hit the link for this post that I was going to feel really bad about scrapping one of my daughter’s temper tantrums as an infant (one of the pics I took for mental birth control). However, I find that this is absolutely true. My moods tend to shift with what is going on in our house so quite often what I put on my scrapbook pages reflects that. It’s nice to see that my pages reflect that part of my tendencies.

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